Devise a Reward, Then Conquer

Much of human behavioral psychology can be explained by the simple phrase “behavior that is rewarded is repeated.”

This is true for the people you hire and even when you reward yourself for your own behavior. To accomplish more right here, right now, identify in advance a “reward” that you’ll bestow upon yourself for completing a desired task.

You Don’t Have to Go All Out

The reward may be as simple as making a phone call. It might be taking a stroll around the block. It could be checking emails, having a cup of herbal tea, totaling up your earnings for the last quarter, or any other small, favorable event. Dr. Aubrey Daniels, in his book Bringing Out the Best in People, calls this the Grandma Principle — scheduling a reward following a good performance.  As Grandma would say, you don’t get to eat your ice cream until you eat your spinach!

If you’re facing an unpleasant task, it makes sense to follow that up with something you enjoy doing, instead of the other way around.

Click through to read the rest of the article.

Share this:

What do you think?

Posted by Jeff Davidson

Jeff Davidson is the world's only holder of the title "The Work-Life Balance Expert®" as awarded by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. He is the premier thought leader on work-life balance, integration, and harmony.

Jeff speaks to organizations that seek to enhance their overall productivity by improving the effectiveness of their people. He is the author of Breathing Space, Simpler Living, Dial it Down, and Everyday Project Management. Visit www.BreathingSpace.com for more information on Jeff's keynote speeches and seminars, including:
* Managing the Pace with Grace®
* Achieving Work-Life Balance™
* Managing Information and Communication Overload®

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

America’s Political Prisoners: The January 6th Capitol Occupiers

Shooting at VA High School in Big Military Town; Students Evacuated (Update 2 hospitalized No Active Shooter)